SSCORRE!

“… In this challenging moment, let’s move beyond “how are you doing?” and get more serious about the questions we’re asking our colleagues, friends, and family.  Fundamentally, learning how to ask questions of ourselves and of the ones who we love can help us to embrace, rather than avoid, the uncertainty that envelopes our lives….”

May 20th, 2020

SSCORRE!
Saint Sophia Cathedral
Online Resources for our Religious Edification

Christos Anesti! 

Christ is Risen! 

TOPIC OF THE WEEK:

“… In this challenging moment, let’s move beyond “how are you doing?” and get more serious about the questions we’re asking our colleagues, friends, and family.  Fundamentally, learning how to ask questions of ourselves and of the ones who we love can help us to embrace, rather than avoid, the uncertainty that envelopes our lives….”

[Click HERE to read 20 great questions to ask instead of ‘how are you doing right now?’]

Spiritual Resources for the Pandemic

Coping with COVID-19 for Orthodox Christians 

Adults/Family:

How are you taking care of yourself today?

What surprising thing have you been stocking up on (that isn’t toilet paper)?

How do you want this experience to change you? How do you think it will?

What do you hope we all learn or take away from this experience?

What times of the day or the week are hardest?

What’s giving you hope right now?

Preschool/Elementary: 

What part of your shelter-in-place residence have you come to appreciate the most?

Which specific place in your neighborhood are you most looking forward to visiting once this is all over?

What’s the easiest part about the quarantine?

What’s the best thing that happened to you today?

Middle School: 

“Even in the best of times (read: when we’re not in the middle of a global pandemic) “How are you doing?” is more likely to be a conversation stopper than a conversation starter, the journalist and author Warren Berger argues in The Book of Beautiful Questions. As Berger notes, “A rote question often evokes a rote answer followed by an echo of the original rote question (“How are you?” “Fine. How are you?”)”
What are some things you have realized that you don’t really need?

What’s something you own that feels useful?

What problem—either yours, or something more global — do you wish you could solve?

How do you want this experience to change you? How do you think it will?

What do you hope we all learn or take away from this experience?

 

High School:

“Of course, being a great question-asker isn’t just about posing a single, powerful question. It’s about listening deeply before and after you ask. It’s about asking out of genuine curiosity versus obligation, and posing follow-up questions that show you’ve been listening. It is both a mindset and a skillset.”

Which member of your family/ friend group have you been thinking about the most during this time? Why?

What’s the most generous act you’ve seen recently?

What habit have you started, or broken, during the quarantine?
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A Message from Maria Spanos

I am passionate about our Orthodox Christian faith and seek to help others learn as much as they can about it. My purpose here is to share online resources that help strengthen our relationship with Christ and bind us closer to His Church. I believe they are invaluable in learning about our precious Orthodox Tradition, and are a great aid for teaching family members, friends and others about Orthodoxy. ~Maria

Two of my favorite quotes:

“A true Christian behaves in this life so that it may be a preparation for the future one and not only a life here below. In his actions, he does not think what will be said of him here but of what will be said there in heaven; he represents to himself that he is always in the presence of God, of the angels and all the saints, and remembers that someday they will bear witness of his thoughts, words, and deeds.”  — Saint John of Kronstadt

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Of all the holy works, the education of children is the most holy.”
— St. Theophan the Recluse